Latest: Dissident Dutch author A.H.J. Dautzenberg alleges serious malpractice on the part of Tim Ballard in his new exclusive: Gruesome Consequences of a Hysterical Witch Hunt, in which mistreatment of his friend Marthijn Uittenbogaard and his partner is also exposed. Both remain incarcerated in Ecuador on trumped-up charges. Legal process recommences 31 March (see updates).

Destroyer

From NewgonWiki
Revision as of 15:57, 17 October 2022 by The Admins (talk | contribs) (→‎Sequels)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Covers from editions 3, 4 and 5

Destroyer – Journal of Apollonian Beauty and Dionysian Homosexuality (f. 2006) was a Swedish-based gay magazine published by Karl Andersson, containing features, photos, essays, interviews, reviews, columns, culture articles and fiction. Unlike most gay magazines, it focuses exclusively on boys and younger men, who, says the editor, were once a part of gay culture, but have vanished in recent years.

Destroyer was the brain child of Karl Andersson, a Swedish magazine professional. In 1999 he headed Straight, Sweden's first glossy gay magazine, and he has since then worked for Aftonbladet, Sweden's biggest daily, Slitz, the biggest men's magazine in Scandinavia, and for IDG Sweden. He has a bachelor of arts degree in language consultancy, MA in Visual and Media Anthropology, and lives in Berlin.

The magazine was printed and officially published in the Czech Republic, but distributed globally through its website, destroyerjournal.com. It has received a lot of criticism from the media and child-protection professionals for allegedly "sexualizing" children, but Andersson has been quick to defend his publication and gives interviews to argue against his critics.

Destroyer contained no images of nude boys under 18, and claimed to be legal in all countries where homosexuality was legal. Whilst the risk of prosecution for owning a copy of a gay magazine is probably very low, some countries have moved to criminalize clothed images of youth under the age of eighteen. Readers should always study the law in their jurisdiction before ordering a magazine of this nature.

Sequels

Some time in the early 10s, Andersson returned to publishing with Breaking Boy News.[1] Both this, and the original Destroyer were featured as a tangent in the Jacob Breslow controversy, with both being wrongly referred to as Child Pornography magazines, or otherwise grossly misrepresented.

Gallery

See also

External link

References